Sonnet 11

You wear your years so well, my love, you know,
Three decades plus and still you look the child-
Yet time like rivers ever onward flow;
Perhaps in love ones’ eyes are then beguiled.
No earthly flower could hold its’ bloom as you,
‘Gainst seasons and the scourge of burning sun;
When other beauty lies in wrinkled ruin,
Your fairest lease shall then have just begun.
“Beauty is truth, truth beauty” it is said;
Perhaps this then explains the present state
And your fair smile is but your truth expressed,
And not some mortal hue enslaved to fate;
If this be such, the question that may rise-
Is beauty truth that time can turn to lies?

© Loubert S Suddaby. All Rights Reserved.

Sonnet 12

I should have known when I first saw you there
Against the backdrop of that summer morn,
That soon my soul would drown in sweet despair
And languish in your wake, asunder torn;
But how could I have known it then, my love,
That your soft velvet hand would crush my heart
Where once it held my spirit high above,
And stayed all sorrow like some sound rampart.
What casualty could curdle sweetest dreams
And callously fond human hope despise?
What chance could tarnish all that future gleams
And lead true love unto this sad demise?
Still, if I had known then what I know now,
Again unto that magic would I bow.

© Loubert S Suddaby. All Rights Reserved.

Sonnet 13

Though years and miles may wedge between two friends
And limit heartfelt thoughts to barren lines;
The truest love such barriers transcend
As though ’twere but the merest mark in time.
Long winters and dark nights mar not the hope
That strengthens with the passing of each hour,
And simple fools in loneliness may grope
When guided not by love’s unending power.
Thus though vast distance holds us two apart
And cruel time may dim fond memory,
Your sterling truth shall ever clasp my heart
And soothe my restless soul eternally;
‘Tis for such truth I hold you still on high;
And for such truth you know that I would die.

© Loubert S Suddaby. All Rights Reserved.

Sonnet 14

When I have wrung the sweetness from my youth
And gained the wisdom of ten thousand days,
Sad knowledge should then outweigh naive truth
With which upon the world I once did gaze.
Then can I bid farewell to childhood grace
That once did cloak the world in fantasy,
And welcome then instead the moveless face
Of life beleaguered in reality.
Of misspent youth I then can make defense
And proudly thus display wise pearls so gleaned,
And in so doing then make recompense
For heedless strife from which my youth was weaned.
Glad folly can enlighten, this believe,
But that which pleases heart, the soul may grieve.

© Loubert S Suddaby. All Rights Reserved.

Sonnet 15

What right have I to feel I was betrayed
When fate and time and chance must have their due?
For yet, in truth, no promise was their made
That joined us in a bond as one, not two;
And have I now the right to grieve my loss?
To bathe myself in self-reproaching woe?
When casualty hath tarnished future gloss,
And not deceitful heart, which still is gold.
Yet your fair face did rob me of sound sight
And made glad hope transcend reality,
And misinterpretation was my plight,
Believing of you what I chose to see.
Yet for such error why should I then be sad,
And weep for loss of that I never had?

© Loubert S Suddaby. All Rights Reserved.

Sonnet 16

The sins of night can shroud the world in hate
And imbue shadows with their hideous power;
And snakes and sightless vermin animate
And wait the coming of the witching hour;
And you in webs of lace lie on your bed,
And paint each silver nail a sanguine hue;
And sordid shadows cloak your pretty head,
And crimson lips now hum a common tune;
And when the time is right you face the mirror,
Enhance the fading colors of your youth–
The gargoyle princess thus can reappear
And mock the sad reflection of your truth;
And though you smile and flaunt the devil’s guise,
The sorrow in your eye can tell no lies.

© Loubert S Suddaby. All Rights Reserved.

Sonnet 17

The evening finds me here again alone,
‘Midst pictures and fond memories of you;
And long dark shadows now do set the tone
Of somberness that haunts each night anew.
The sun then slowly drowns itself in night
And smothers evening gold in grey and gloom;
And tears of salt do blur and sting my sight,
As I recall your presence in this room.
The sweetness of your smile still lingers on
Much like the smell of blossoms, summer born;
And thus I feel you here though you are gone;
Your memory is my rose, the pain my thorn;
For not a day has passed since you did leave
That sorrow has not stalked without reprieve.

© Loubert S Suddaby. All Rights Reserved.

Sonnet 18

When time has robbed you of your angel guise
And blanched the roses in your cherub cheeks,
Your silver mirror friend you will despise
Whose silent council oft you once did seek.
What will you think of youth’s proud failing light
Whose passing marks your sad mortality?
And what then of your beauty’s fickle flight
Whose presence will soon seem but heresy?
What then of youthful dalliance forgone,
And daring dreams now mocked and marred by time?
How will you greet the disappearing dawn,
Now but a saddened memory of your prime?
You mocked life’s bud and now you mock its bloom.
You squander time, nay; time will squander you.

© Loubert S Suddaby. All Rights Reserved.

Sonnet 19

I felt your breath upon my cheek last night,
So velvet soft and yet like roses sweet;
I saw your skin bathed in a silver light,
Your bed did float on moonlit shadows deep.
Your chest did rise and fall in noiseless peace
Discernible by hand but not by eye
And sable hair much like the finest fleece
Enveloped countenance of honesty.
I held you close and felt your body’s heat
Warm first my heart and then my very soul
For with your grace no angel could compete,
Nor could she such a blissful gift bestow.
Thus did I lay and watch you in your sleep
And mourned to hold that which I cannot keep.

© Loubert S Suddaby. All Rights Reserved.